2020-2021

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Co-requisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”

 

Definition of Face-to-Face, Online, Remote, and Hybrid Courses

Face-to-Face courses are taught on campus at the scheduled course times so that students can interact with their instructor and classmates in person. Course learning outcomes are the same as online, remote, and hybrid courses.

Online courses are taught using Blackboard, and students are not typically required to log in at specific times. Assignments have deadlines, but students have the flexibility of studying where and when they want. Professors can require students to take exams in person or online at specific date and time. Access to a camera and microphone may be required. Course learning outcomes are the same as face-to-face, remote, and hybrid courses.

Remote Learning courses are taught using Zoom and Blackboard and require students to log in at the scheduled course times to interact with their instructor and classmates. Professors can require students to take exams in person or online at specific date and time. Access to a camera and microphone are required. Course learning outcomes are the same as face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses.

Hybrid courses are taught using a combination of face-to-face and online activities and require students to attend on-campus, in-person scheduled classes. Access to a camera and microphone are required. Course learning outcomes are the same as face-to-face, online, and remote courses.

Course Delivery

Face-to-Face

Online

Remote

Hybrid

Content on Blackboard

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Meeting Times

Specific times

If needed (see course schedule)

Specific times

Specific times

Instructor/Peer Interaction

In person

Online

Zoom

In person and online

Location

On campus

Virtual

Virtual

On campus and virtual

Exams

On campus

Online, possibly in person or online at specific date and time

Online, possibly in person or online at specific date and time

On campus, possibly online

Camera/Microphone Required

No

In Some Courses(see course schedule)

Yes

Yes

Minimum Technical Requirements

  • Regular access to a computer/device with access to Internet (cell phone is not acceptable)
  • Access to Internet browsers such as Chrome, Safari, or Firefox
  • Access to PCCC student email
  • Basic Microsoft Office skills (PCCC provides all students with Microsoft Office 365 Suite)

Course learning outcomes are the same for face-to-face, remote, hybrid, and online courses.


CU 214 - Advanced Baking and Patisserie
( 2 :8 :0 ) 6 credits

This course, lecture and lab, is designed for Pastry Arts majors and covers the essentials for entering the food industry as a working professional pastry chef, pastry cook or baker, This course serves as an in depth exposure to pastry and baking theory, terminology, good-handling standards, kitchen operations, production organization and timing skills through extensive hands-on experiences of classical and modern baking techniques.

DE 010 - Academic English I
( 6 :2 :0 ) 7 credits

This course is designed to assist students in developing the critical reading and process writing skills necessary for success in college-level courses. Students must demonstrate active reading, comprehension, and textual analysis skills as a point of reference for composing paragraph, essay, and research assignments.

A grade of “C” or higher is required for completion of a Developmental course requirement.

Pre-Requisites:

Test placement/Accuplacer placement


DE 020 - Academic English II
( 6 :2 :0 ) 7 credits

This course is designed to assist students in developing the critical reading and process writing skills necessary for success in college-level courses. Students must demonstrate active reading, comprehension, and textual analysis skills as a point of reference for written analyses that integrate textual support, using appropriate MLA formatting and citation in essay assignments and research projects.

A grade of “C” or higher is required for moving to college level and for completion of the developmental requirement.

Pre-Requisites:

A grade of “C” or higher in DE 010 or test placement  


DE 025 - Advanced Studies in Academic English
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is designed to assist students in developing academic reading and writing skills, which include composing multi-paragraph essays through the use of the writing process, analyzing and responding to college level texts, planning and writing in-class essays, and revising and editing all written products to minimize high order and medium order grammar and usage errors. Emphasis will be placed in students’ ability to integrate complex ideas from multiple sources into their own writing. Research skills will be introduced.  

Pre-Requisites:
DE 010 - Academic English I

or Accuplacer placement 


Co-Requisites:
EN 101 - Composition I

EC 101 - Economics I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers such basic economic concepts as the elements of national income, inflation, and unemployment, the economic roles of government, determination of national income, business cycles, the global economy, and monetary and fiscal policies. EC 101 emphasizes macroeconomics.

EC 102 - Economics II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course further explores economic principles emphasizing composition and pricing of national output, distribution of income, trade unions, cost analysis, women at work, income inequality, the pricing factors of production, international trade and finance, and an evaluation of alternative economic systems. EC 102 emphasizes microeconomics.

EC 105 - Introduction to Labor Studies
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers the historical foundations of the American labor movement, the legal framework of labor and management relations, the structure and functions of the labor movement, and collective bargaining.

ECE 102 - Creative Expression--Art, Music, and Movement for Children
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Students explore the connection between children’s intellectual growth and creative development via art, music, and movement. Using artistic materials, students take an in depth look at the methods and techniques used in developing creativity in the young child.

 

Pre-Requisites:
EN 101 - Composition I

ECE 105 - Health Safety, and Nutrition for the Young Child
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course includes a study of the laws, regulations, standards, policies, and procedures of safety, health, and nutrition as they relate to the early childhood setting, home, and community for children ages birth through eight. Topics include hygiene, safe learning environments, childhood diseases, immunizations, universal precautions, first-aid and CPR, nutritional guidelines and meal-planning, state and local regulations concerning abuse and neglect, emergencies, disease/poison prevention, and referral procedures to utilize school and community resources to meet the needs of the young child. The course also addresses methods, materials, and developmentally appropriate activities for children and parent education as it relates to these areas.

Pre-Requisites:
EN 101 - Composition I

ECE 106 - Practical Mathematics and Science for Young Children
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Students learn to apply simple math concepts and the scientific method to develop children’s natural curiosity of the world around them.

Pre-Requisites:
EN 101 - Composition I

MA 005 


ECE 107 - Nurturing Mental Health in Early Childhood
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores essential elements involved in setting the foundation for the mental health and development of infants and toddlers. It examines the importance of identifying and meeting their social/emotional needs and how these needs relate to the caregiver’s interactive process. The course integrates the implementation of developmental brain research with the interactive process of caregiving with a special focus on developmentally appropriate practices and techniques in the childcare setting.

ECE 108 - Infant Toddler Care and Curriculum
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers the development of quality daycare for infants and toddlers, the development levels of infancy, and how to design experiences that stimulate their cognitive, social, and creative ability and meet their physical and emotional needs.

Pre-Requisites:
EN 101 - Composition I
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology

ECE 110 - Child Development Associate (CDA) I
( 4 :0 :0 ) 4 credits

This course includes a study of the requirements for the Child Development Associate National Credential (CDA). Students will acquire a working knowledge of child growth and development principles. Skills and strategies for managing an effective program and planning a safe, healthful learning environment are emphasized. Students will practice via class discussion role play and other process oriented techniques the knowledge attitudes and skills for supporting and advancing child growth in physical, intellectual, social and emotional development.  

ECE 111 - Child Development Associate (CDA) II
( 4 :0 :0 ) 4 credits

This course expands on the student’s knowledge of child growth and development principles acquired during ECE 110, and focuses on the practical skills needed to become a Child Development Associate. They will complete the professional portfolio which is part of the CDA application process.   

Pre-Requisites:
ECE 110 - Child Development Associate (CDA) I

ECE 200 - Early Childhood Education in Contemporary America
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides an overview of the history, theories, principles, and developmentally appropriate practices relevant to early childhood education in infant, toddler, and preschool through primary settings with site visits to infant care centers, nursery school, pre K, Head Start and kindergartens, where students observe real-life practices and then discuss and evaluate them. It emphasizes material selection and curriculum development, as well as issues such as bilingual and multicultural education in the context of social policy and legislation.  Twenty (20) hours of unsupervised field observation are required outside of the three (3) credit lecture.

Pre-Requisites:
EN 101 - Composition I
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology

ECE 201 - Observation and Assessment of Young Children
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines the basic principles of observation and assessment of children in early childhood settings. It focuses on the appropriate use of observation tools such as anecdotal records, rating scales and checklists, in order to observe and document children’s growth, use of a variety of observational techniques, and standards-based performance assessments to inform instructional practice and ensure developmentally appropriate curriculum. Five (5) hours of unsupervised field observation are required outside of the three (3) credit lecture.

Pre-Requisites:
ECE 200 - Early Childhood Education in Contemporary America
OR
PS 102 - Human Growth and Development

ECE 202 - Supervised Field Experience I
( 1 :0 :6 ) 3 credits

This course includes six (6) hours a week of field experience in early childhood settings to allow students to apply knowledge and skills under the supervision of an early care and education professional. Emphasis is placed on designing, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate activities and environments for all children and demonstrating reflective and professional practices. Includes weekly seminar meetings. 90 fieldwork hours.

Pre-Requisites:
ECE 107 - Nurturing Mental Health in Early Childhood
ECE 210 - Child Development Associate (CDA) Field Experience

ECE 203 - Supervised Field Experience II
( 1 :0 :6 ) 3 credits

This course includes six (6) hours a week of field experience in early childhood settings to allow students to apply knowledge and skills at an advanced level under the supervision of an early care and educational professional. It is a capstone experience for the Associate in Applied Science in Early Childhood Education degree. Emphasis is placed on designing, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate activities and environments for all children and demonstrating reflective and professional practices. Includes weekly seminar meetings. 90 fieldwork hours.

Pre-Requisites:
ECE 202 - Supervised Field Experience I

ECE 205 - Professionalism in Infant-Toddler Settings
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides the Infant/Toddler caregiver with the tools to enhance their skills as professionals. The fundamentals of the course are embedded in National Association of the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation. This course examines 5 key components of professionalism: core knowledge and competencies, program quality standards, ethical conduct and reflective practice, advocacy and leadership, and professional collaborations and development. Students will be prepared to integrate these components into the delivery of high quality professional caregiving.

Pre-Requisites:
ECE 107 - Nurturing Mental Health in Early Childhood

ECE 210 - Child Development Associate (CDA) Field Experience
( 0 :0 :9 ) 3 credits

This course requires nine (9) hours a week of field experience via employment or volunteer service early childhood settings serving children from birth through five years of age. Students develop and demonstrate professional competencies and practical skills, as outlined by the Child Development Associate (CDA) National Credentialing Program. This course provides firsthand experience in integrating knowledge, skills, and techniques with teaching practice needed for the CDA Credential. 135 fieldwork hours.

Pre-Requisites:
ECE 111 - Child Development Associate (CDA) II

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