2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


BS 201 - Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course studies the impact of exercise upon fitness and health. The effects of exercise on various body systems are discussed. Methods available to quantify exercise intensity and measurement of energy expenditure during exercise are demonstrated. Laboratory sessions provide experience in measurement and testing of cardio respiratory response to exercise. Fitness testing and data collection during lab sessions will provide practical experience for the workplace.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 100 - Human Biology
OR
BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I

BS 203 - Microbiology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course studies the characteristics of microorganisms including morphology, metabolism, genetics, cultivation, effects on human life, and the environment. Clinical aspects as well as emerging topics such as food poisoning outbreaks, antimicrobial resistance, genetic engineering, and bioterrorism are included. Laboratory sessions cover basic procedures culminating in the identification of unknown bacterial samples.

Pre-Requisites:

CH 103 or CH 111, and either BS 101 & BS 102 or BS 103 & BS 104


BS 204 - Introduction to Ecology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the fundamental processes by which organisms interact with the living and nonliving components of their environment. Topics include evolution and adaptation to the environment, types of species interactions, threats to ecological systems, population and community dynamics, and the influence of human activity in ecological processes. The laboratory component include the scientific method, collection, and analysis of data, field study methods, computer simulation, and field trips designed to explore the variety of habitats in New Jersey.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I
OR
SC 104 - Introduction to Environmental Science

Choose either SC 104 or BS 101


BS 205 - Physiology of Disease
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces the study of disease pathology. Included in this course are the description, etiology, sign and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and current medical treatment, including pharmacology, progress, and prevention of diseases, of the major body system, with emphasis on basic concepts and the terminology of pathology.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 104 - Anatomy and Physiology II

BS 207 - Cell Biology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course provides a survey of principles of cell biology structure and function and hands-on instruction of common techniques. Topics such as subcellular compartmentalization,sorting, trafficking, membrane function & dynamics, cell cycle & control, signal transduction, cytoskeleton function, cell-cell interactions are presented. The laboratory component will include the scientific method as a means of investigating cell staining, cell fractionation, protein isolation and separation, microscopy techniques.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I

BS 211 - Molecular Genetics
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course focuses on the steps required to synthesize proteins from genes, the regulation of these steps as well as the manipulation and analysis of genes. Topics discussed include: a) Mendelian genetics; b) chromatin structure, DNA replication, repair and recombination; c) the control of gene expression at various levels; d) Recombinant DNA techniques; e) Proteonomics and Genomics techniques. Laboratory experiments provide hands-on instruction of techniques in DNA purification and recombinant DNA technology and the principles of Mendelian Genetics. 

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I

BS 212 - Biology of Aging
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course will explore scientific discoveries that have informed the understanding of the biology of aging. Nutritional impacts of calorie restriction, nutritional intervention in age related diseases and the effects of commonly consumed chemicals on aging processes will be discussed. Why older people are more likely to experience specific diseases, and whether or not aging is an intrinsically progressive decline in function or itself a disease, will serve as central themes for the course’s investigation.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 100 - Human Biology
OR
BS 101 - Biology I

BS 213 - Microbiology of Food
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This courser provides an overview of how mircrorganisms impact food and explores processing, preservation, spoilage and foodborne illnesses. Discussions will include properties of macronutrients and how these may be manipulated chemically, physically and biologically.

Pre-Requisites:
CH 211 - Organic Chemistry I

BU 100 - Personal Finance and Money Management
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces students to the complexities of modern personal money management and helps them avoid some problems in everyday living. The topics covered include the development of a needs analysis and budgeting, basic investment options, the intricacies of home ownership, consumer credit, the need for insurances, and retirement planning. Students must be college-level.

Pre-Requisites:

Students must be college-level. 


BU 101 - Introduction to Business
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces the various fields of business study. Topics include economic systems, small business development, forms of U.S. businesses, management, marketing, accounting, finance, banking, and ethics. It prepares for higherlevel business studies and is excellent for non-business majors who wish to gain an introduction to financial and economic survival leading to successful financial planning.

BU 102 - Business Mathematics
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the basic skills in arithmetic computation necessary for business operations. It also reviews fundamentals of arithmetic processes, fractions, decimals, percentages, problem solving, trade and cash discounts, borrowing and lending money, and determining markup. The material covered offers a basis for subsequent courses in accounting, merchandising, and related business subjects.

Pre-Requisites:
MA 025A - Algebra A

BU 103 - Customer Service
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers techniques and practical approaches to customer service. It also explores the need for establishing good communication with the customer, anticipating, identifying, and satisfying customer needs. Emphasis is placed on verbal and nonverbal communication, listening to the customer, and customer service in a diverse world, managing stress and time, and encouraging customer loyalty. Upon successful completion of the course, students are eligible to take the National Retail Federation (NRF) exam

Pre-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

BU 106 - Introduction to Sport Administration
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides students with an overview of the sport industry. It covers basic fundamental knowledge and skill sets of the sport manager, information on sport industry segments for potential job employment, and career choices

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

BU 117 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course will provide students with an overview of the hospitality industry. It will provide insight into restaurant operations and business practices of on-site sectors to include both contracted and self-operation units. Offered once per year. 

Pre-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

BU 121 - Sanitation and Safety in Food Service Operations
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Participants develop an understanding of sanitation and safety concepts in the operation of a food service establish­ment. Concentration is on current laws, food-borne illnesses, safe storage for food, protecting food in preparation and serving, pest control, accident prevention, and crisis management.NOTE: Food Sanitation Certification is available upon course completion and passing the ServSafe Manager Certification Exam. (Exam Cost: Approximately $40). 

Pre-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

BU 122 - Lodging Essentials
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the real-world knowledge and skills needed for a long-term career in the lodging industry. Emphasis is placed on all areas of the hotel including food & beverage, front desk, guest services, reservations, housekeeping, restaurant service, banquet set-up, security and more. 

Pre-Requisites:
BU 117 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

BU 201 - Business Law
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers the fundamental nature, structure, and processes of our legal system. The course emphasis is on contract law. Concepts such as offers, acceptance, consideration, capacity, third-party contracts, and breaches & remedies are emphasized. Preparing briefs and analysis are required. This course uses a lecture and case study approach.

Pre-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
ENS 106 - Public Speaking

BU 203 - Principles of Marketing
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers a managerial approach to all the decision variables facing marketing managers in an increasingly diverse environment. Product, price, promotion, and distribution strategies are emphasized. Case studies of actual marketing situations are reviewed and discussed.

Pre-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
ENS 106 - Public Speaking

BU 204 - Principles of Sport Marketing
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers a managerial approach to all the decision variables facing marketing managers in the sport industry. Strategic planning, marketing research, marketing strategies, consumer behavior in different sport venues are emphasized. Case studies of Public Relations and especially Sponsorship Agreements are reviewed and discussed. Students will develop a Marketing Plan and a Sponsorship Proposal.

Pre-Requisites:
BU 106 - Introduction to Sport Administration
BU 203 - Principles of Marketing

BU 206 - Business Statistics
( 4 :0 :0 ) 4 credits

This course teaches a business, problem-solving approach using statistics to solve business-related problems. Topics include summarizing qualitative and quantitative data, preparation and analysis of cross tabulation tables, scatter diagram, and correlation coefficient. Measures of central tendency, dispersion, probability, estimation, and hypothesis testing are discussed in detail.

Pre-Requisites:
MA 025 - Accelerated Algebra
OR
MA 025B - Algebra B