2020-2021

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Co-requisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”

 

Definition of Face-to-Face, Online, Remote, and Hybrid Courses

Face-to-Face courses are taught on campus at the scheduled course times so that students can interact with their instructor and classmates in person. Course learning outcomes are the same as online, remote, and hybrid courses.

Online courses are taught using Blackboard, and students are not typically required to log in at specific times. Assignments have deadlines, but students have the flexibility of studying where and when they want. Professors can require students to take exams in person or online at specific date and time. Access to a camera and microphone may be required. Course learning outcomes are the same as face-to-face, remote, and hybrid courses.

Remote Learning courses are taught using Zoom and Blackboard and require students to log in at the scheduled course times to interact with their instructor and classmates. Professors can require students to take exams in person or online at specific date and time. Access to a camera and microphone are required. Course learning outcomes are the same as face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses.

Hybrid courses are taught using a combination of face-to-face and online activities and require students to attend on-campus, in-person scheduled classes. Access to a camera and microphone are required. Course learning outcomes are the same as face-to-face, online, and remote courses.

Course Delivery

Face-to-Face

Online

Remote

Hybrid

Content on Blackboard

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Meeting Times

Specific times

If needed (see course schedule)

Specific times

Specific times

Instructor/Peer Interaction

In person

Online

Zoom

In person and online

Location

On campus

Virtual

Virtual

On campus and virtual

Exams

On campus

Online, possibly in person or online at specific date and time

Online, possibly in person or online at specific date and time

On campus, possibly online

Camera/Microphone Required

No

In Some Courses(see course schedule)

Yes

Yes

Minimum Technical Requirements

  • Regular access to a computer/device with access to Internet (cell phone is not acceptable)
  • Access to Internet browsers such as Chrome, Safari, or Firefox
  • Access to PCCC student email
  • Basic Microsoft Office skills (PCCC provides all students with Microsoft Office 365 Suite)

Course learning outcomes are the same for face-to-face, remote, hybrid, and online courses.


AU 105 - Engine Repair
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course is a study of the modern internal combustion gasoline engine including basic principles of design and operation. This course covers disassembly, inspection and precision measuring and continues with reassembly including fitting and reconditioning parts. It also includes materials covering engine support systems including cooling, lubrication and basic ignition system fundamentals and engine lubricants.

Co-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals

AU 110 - Automotive Brake Systems
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course is a study of the design, operation, diagnosis and repair procedures associated with automotive brake systems, including power assist units, vacuum boosters and hydro-booster systems. Students perform diagnostics, components  replacement and repair, hydraulic systems pressure tests and total overhaul of brake systems including ABS. Successful completion of the course prepares students to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) test for brakes.

Pre-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals
AU 105 - Engine Repair
AU 130 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics I

AU 115 - Automotive Steering Suspension, and Alignment
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course covers the design, operating principles and service of automotive suspension and steering systems including McPherson strut and multi-link designs, solid axle, and independent systems. Tire construction, wear diagnosis and service are covered and emphasis is placed on wheel alignment procedures, including computerized four wheel alignment. New technologies are covered including four wheel steering, electronic steering, and computerized suspension systems. upon successful completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) steering and suspension certification examination.

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals
AU 125 - Engine Performance
AU 130 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics I

AU 125 - Engine Performance
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course is designed to give students the training required to service automotive computer systems. Emphasis is placed on computer controlled fuel systems and the use of scan tools and diagnostic modes to solve drivability problems.

Pre-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals
AU 105 - Engine Repair
AU 130 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics I

AU 130 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics I
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers basic electrical theories and how it applies to the automobile. Students are required to test and overhaul components of the starting, charging, body and chassis electrical systems.

Pre-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals
AU 105 - Engine Repair

AU 210 - Automotive and Manual Transmission Servicing
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course presents the theory and operation of manual and automatic transmissions/trans axles, clutches, drive shafts, rear ends, front-wheel drive and four wheel drive. Students will remove , inspect, diagnose , and rebuild various component of these systems. Upon successful completion of this course , students will be prepared to take the Automotive Service Excellence(ASE) certification exam in manual Transmissions/Trans axles and Drive Trains.  

Pre-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals

AU 230 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics II
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course begins with a review of electrical automotive fundamentals, and then proceeds into capacitance, magnetism, semi-conductors, amplifiers, integrated circuits, and microprocessors as they relate to the automobile. It introduces hybrid vehicles and their configurations. Students will diagnose and trouble-shoot as practical applications of the above information.

 

Pre-Requisites:
AU 130 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics I

AU 235 - Automotive Heating and Air Condition
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers the theory, operation, and servicing of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems in the automobile. Students will test, service and repair heating and cooling systems following EPA regulations. This course prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification exam in Automotive Heating/ Air Conditioning. Students are required to pass the refrigerant recovery and recycling exam to meet EPA Section 609 of the Clean Air Act of 1990.

Pre-Requisites:
AU 101 - Automotive Fundamentals
AU 105 - Engine Repair
AU 130 - Automotive Electricity/Electronics I

AU 240 - Advanced Vehicle Diagnostics
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course begins with a review of basic electrical theories and basic scan tool operations, and focuses on modern diagnostic techniques with extensive hands-on practice using electronic diagnostic tools. This course focuses on wiring diagram interpretation circuit analysis as well as pinpoint testing. It will also include modern diagnostic test techniques as well as data analysis and repair solution formulation. After successful completion of AU 125 and this course , students will be eligible to sit for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Engine Performance test.

Pre-Requisites:
AU 125 - Engine Performance

BS 100 - Human Biology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is a one-semester lecture and laboratory course designed for non-science majors for the study of the structure and function of all the body systems. It covers such current issues as genetic engineering and biotechnology and health concerns such as AIDS and cancer. Laboratory experiments include light microscopy, human anatomy and physiology, and representative dissections.

Pre-Requisites:
MA 022 - Mathematics Fundamentals for Liberal Arts
MA 025 - Accelerated Algebra
MA 025A - Algebra A
MA 025B - Algebra B

 or test placement


BS 101 - Biology I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the basic study of the principles underlying the science of cells and organisms. Included are topics related to biochemistry, cell structure and function, effects of the physical environment on cells, genetics, genetic engineering, heredity, evolution, and selected biological problems. Laboratory experiments include investigations of physical and chemical life processes, analysis of cellular components, cellular functions, cell reproduction, and heredity.

BS 102 - Biology II
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the basic study of representative organisms of the five kingdoms, with an emphasis on classification, differential features, and reproduction. For the plant and animal kingdoms, it covers fundamentals of development, physiological control systems, organ systems, nutrition, movement, ecology, and selected biological problems of representative organisms. The laboratory sessions include dissections and experimental studies of selected representative organisms for all kingdoms. 

BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic structural and functional relationships of the human body at the cellular, organ, and system levels, including the major histological and gross anatomical structures of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Anatomy is emphasized in the laboratory. Knowledge of chemistry required.

BS 104 - Anatomy and Physiology II
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course studies the major anatomical and functional aspects of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems, as well as nutrition, metabolism, and acid-base balance, and homeostatic mechanisms. Laboratory exercises include anatomical dissections, microscopic study, and physiology activities

Pre-Requisites:
BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I

BS 201 - Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course studies the impact of exercise upon fitness and health. The effects of exercise on various body systems are discussed. Methods available to quantify exercise intensity and measurement of energy expenditure during exercise are demonstrated. Laboratory sessions provide experience in measurement and testing of cardio respiratory response to exercise. Fitness testing and data collection during lab sessions will provide practical experience for the workplace.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 100 - Human Biology
OR
BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I

BS 203 - Microbiology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course studies the characteristics of microorganisms including morphology, metabolism, genetics, cultivation, effects on human life, and the environment. Clinical aspects as well as emerging topics such as food poisoning outbreaks, antimicrobial resistance, genetic engineering, and bioterrorism are included. Laboratory sessions cover basic procedures culminating in the identification of unknown bacterial samples.

Pre-Requisites:

CH 103 or CH 111, and
either BS 101 and BS 102 or BS 103 and BS 104


BS 204 - Introduction to Ecology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the fundamental processes by which organisms interact with the living and nonliving components of their environment. Topics include evolution and adaptation to the environment, types of species interactions, threats to ecological systems, population and community dynamics, and the influence of human activity in ecological processes. The laboratory component include the scientific method, collection, and analysis of data, field study methods, computer simulation, and field trips designed to explore the variety of habitats in New Jersey.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I
OR
SC 104 - Introduction to Environmental Science

Choose either SC 104 or BS 101


BS 205 - Physiology of Disease
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces the study of disease pathology. Included in this course are the description, etiology, sign and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and current medical treatment, including pharmacology, progress, and prevention of diseases, of the major body system, with emphasis on basic concepts and the terminology of pathology.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 104 - Anatomy and Physiology II

BS 207 - Cell Biology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course provides a survey of principles of cell biology structure and function and hands-on instruction of common techniques. Topics such as subcellular compartmentalization,sorting, trafficking, membrane function & dynamics, cell cycle & control, signal transduction, cytoskeleton function, cell-cell interactions are presented. The laboratory component will include the scientific method as a means of investigating cell staining, cell fractionation, protein isolation and separation, microscopy techniques.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I

BS 211 - Molecular Genetics
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course focuses on the steps required to synthesize proteins from genes, the regulation of these steps as well as the manipulation and analysis of genes. Topics discussed include: a) Mendelian genetics; b) chromatin structure, DNA replication, repair and recombination; c) the control of gene expression at various levels; d) Recombinant DNA techniques; e) Proteonomics and Genomics techniques. Laboratory experiments provide hands-on instruction of techniques in DNA purification and recombinant DNA technology and the principles of Mendelian Genetics. 

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I

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