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2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


SO 205 - Death and Dying
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the biological, sociological, and psychological perspectives of death, dying, and bereavement in our society and around the world. Topics include euthanasia, suicide, terminal illness, funeral and burial rituals, and cultural and ethical values and problems related to death and terminal illness in contemporary society.

Pre-Requisites:
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology
OR
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SO 208 - Human Sexuality
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the biological, psychological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality. Topics include attraction, love, sexual anatomy, sexual response cycle, sexual differentiation and orientation, sexual reproduction, contraception, sexual behaviors, sexual dysfunctions, and sexually transmitted illnesses.

See PS 208. This course is also called PS 208; no credit is given if students have taken PS 208. 

Pre-Requisites:
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology
OR
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SO 210 - Deviance and Social Control
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces theoretical and methodological perspectives on deviance and social control. It also discusses social organization of deviance and informal and formal means of social control.

Pre-Requisites:
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SO 212 - Sociology of Education
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course uses sociological perspectives and theories to understand the relationships between schools and society. The functions and roles of schools in modern societies and their impact on people’s outcomes in life are examined. Topics include stratification, diversity, and the dynamics of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender in education, inequality, social mobility, the organizational characteristics of schooling, schools/classrooms as social systems, education policies, and practices and prospects for school reform.

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SP 101 - Elementary Spanish I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course uses a comprehension-based proficiency approach to the acquisition of Spanish. Pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar are presented audiovisually in a natural, culture-based context through the continuous story line of Destinos, a Spanish soap opera. Students practice speaking, writing, and reading skills while developing a high level of listening comprehension. In addition to language skills, students develop cultural knowledge and awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. This course is for those students whose native language is not Spanish.

1 hour laboratory

SP 102 - Elementary Spanish II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a continuation of Spanish 101 with greater emphasis placed on developing oral communication. Through the Destinos soap opera format, students increase their Spanish language skills and knowledge of Hispanic cultures. This course is for those students whose native language is not Spanish and have had two years of High School Spanish or SP 101.

Pre-Requisites:
SP 101 - Elementary Spanish I

The prerequisite may be waived for students with 2 years of High School Spanish or permission of the Department.


SP 108 - Spanish I for Native Speakers
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is intended for students who speak Spanish at home and want to improve their formal grammatical knowledge of the language. Emphasis is placed on strengthening students’ reading, writing, and vocabulary skills. Problematic points due to English interference receive special attention.

SP 109 - Spanish II for Native Speakers
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a continuation of SP 108, intended for Hispanic students who speak Spanish and want to improve their formal knowledge of the language. Reading, writing, and vocabulary skills continue to be developed through selected readings in Spanish and Latin American literature

Pre-Requisites:
SP 108 - Spanish I for Native Speakers

SP 201 - Intermediate Spanish I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is intended for those students who have completed Spanish 102 and wish to continue improving their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary are presented audiovisually in a natural, culture-based context. Special emphasis is placed on developing more advanced conversational skills through continued exposure to the Destinos soap opera, diverse classroom activities, and authentic realia.

Pre-Requisites:
SP 102 - Elementary Spanish II

The prerequisite may be waived with 3 years of High School Spanish or permission of the Department.


SP 202 - Intermediate Spanish II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a continuation of SP 201 with emphasis on developing more advanced listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The materials used include the Destinos soap opera, films, authentic realia, and relevant field trips.

Pre-Requisites:
SP 201 - Intermediate Spanish I

The prerequisite may be waived for students with 3 years of High School Spanish or permission of the Department.


SP 205 - Latin American Literature
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces major genres of literature with special emphasis on the techniques of reading and interpreting novels, short stories, essays, and poetry. It analyzes the relationship between each literary piece and the historic period in which it was written. This course is intended for those students who have completed SP 202 or are native Spanish speakers.

ST 110 - Acting I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course uses extensive physical and vocal exercises, techniques for freeing spontaneous personal feeling, and the process of bringing all these elements together through detailed work on text material. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to sustain strong focus of attention and highly concentrated energy. Scene study is used to apply concentration principles.

ST 111 - Acting II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course exposes students to a broader range of experience in the various acting styles and stresses the mental, physical, and emotional disciplines required.

Pre-Requisites:
ST 110 - Acting I

ST 112 - Introduction to Theater
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course addresses the role of theater as an art form and means of communicating ideas regarding cultural value and human understanding. Contributions of the audience, playwright, actor, director, designer, and technician to theatrical production are covered. Elements of historical genres, the importance of audience, and the total experience of theater are discussed as supplemental to the foundation material mentioned above.

WLD 105 - Interpreting Blueprints and Layout
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course introduces the basic fundamentals of blueprint  reading specifically for students in the welding field. Through interpretation and sketching, students learn to visualize the part, section, or assembly. An emphasis is placed on identifying the types of welds, and the associated abbreviations and symbols pertinent to the trade. 

WLD 110 - Introduction to Welding Fundamentals
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course introduces a basic understanding of the equipment and processes used in the field of welding. It includes the key variables that affect the quality of welds. Students will acquire the skills to perform manual cutting, welding and brazing, techniques, operation and proper handling of oxyfuel equipment. Fundamentals of plasma arc cutting, gas metal arc, and flux cored welding procedures are introduced. The importance of safety procedures and practices is incorporated throughout the course.

WLD 115 - Intermediate Welding
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course offers a basic understanding of the shielded metal arc process and equipment along with key variables that affect the quality of welds. It includes an understanding of welding distortion and how to control it and the guidelines for electrode selection through the use of ER 6010 fast freeze and ER 7018 low hydrogen electrodes on plate. Students are introduced to gas tungsten welding and the skills of correct fabrication procedures. The importance of safety procedures and practices is incorporated throughout the course.

WLD 120 - Advanced Welding
( 2 :4 :0 ) 4 credits

This course addresses more advanced topics in shielded metal arc and gas tungsten arc welding. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to fabricate and perform welding procedures in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions on plate and pipe with open root and backing. Skills to properly prepare, and accurately assemble weldments on ferrous and non-ferrous metals are also addressed. The importance of safety procedures and practices is incorporated throughout the course.

WLD 150 - Welding Capstone
( 0 :2 :0 ) 1 credits

Students will demonstrate readiness for welding employment through the development and performance of a comprehensive hands-on welding project, and the successful completion of an industry based written assessment. A written resume and interview skills and procedures are emphasized.