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2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


RM 207 - Foodservice Purchasing
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course is designed to teach students inventory and purchasing and provides students with marketable skills for a career with the Restaurant and Foodservice industry. Students will learn purchase quality and quantity requirements, how to select vendors, how to make pricing decisions and how to establish effective procedures for ordering products. Purchasing ethics and establishing vendor relationships, and purchasing follow-up will also be covered.

The texts and final exams are part of the ManageFirst® Program from the National Restaurant Association (NRA). This course provides students with marketable skills for a career with the Restaurant and Foodservice industry. Students also take the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Exam in Food Safety and the Alcohol Exam to receive NRA-branded certificates. By completing 4 Core topics and 1 Foundation Topic of ManageFirst® Program students can achieve the Foodservice Management Professional® (FMP®) credential. This course completes 1 core topic and 1 foundation topic of that program.

Pre-Requisites:
RM 105 - Dining Room Service
RM 107 - Cost Control in Foodservice

RM 209 - Restaurant Management
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course focuses on Hospitality and Restaurant Management topics. Students will learn restaurant leadership skills and how to effectively communicate with employees to facilitate employee performance and teamwork. They will learn to manage employee work schedules, daily operations, meetings and compensation programs. Employee retention and termination will also be discussed.

The texts and final exams are part of the ManageFirst® Program from the National Restaurant Association (NRA). This course provides students with marketable skills for a career with the Restaurant and Foodservice industry. Students also take the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Exam in Food Safety and the Alcohol Exam to receive NRA-branded certificates. By completing 4 Core topics and 1 Foundation Topic of ManageFirst® Program students can achieve the Foodservice Management Professional® (FMP®) credential. This course completes 1 core topic and 1 foundation topic of that program.

Pre-Requisites:
RM 105 - Dining Room Service
RM 205 - Foodservice Human Resources Management & Supervision

SC 103 - Nutrition
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course introduces students to the biochemical basis of nutrient action. Topics include the structure, function and metabolism of the three primary nutrients—carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, as well as the interaction of various enzymes, vitamins, and hormones on food metabolism. Physiology of nutrient deficiencies and study in methods of research in nutrition are also covered. Laboratory experiments include chemical analysis of major nutrients, measurement of kilocalories, metric units, and percentages of nutrients.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisites:  MA 025 Accelerated Algebra, MA 025A Algebra A, MA 025B Algebra B or test placement


SC 104 - Introduction to Environmental Science
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the fundamental science principles associated with environmental studies and the causes of environmental problems. Topics include land, air, and water resources, energy, ecology, sustainability, sytems analysis, impacts of laws, policies, and economics, and the human role in the environment. The laboratory reinforces course topics through the application of scientific methods, introduction of field study techniques, computer simulations, field trips, and collection and analysis of data.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisites:  MA 025 Accelerated Algebra, MA 025A Algebra A, MA 025B Algebra B or test placement


SC 105 - Astronomy
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course provides an introduction to astronomy covering the laws of physics and chemistry that govern the movements and compostion of the physical universe. It includes discussions on motion, composition, and evolution of planets, stars and interstellar matter. It also examines the structure and evolution of the universe.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisites:  MA 025 Accelerated Algebra, MA 025A Algebra A, MA 025B Algebra B or test placement


SC 106 - The Physics of Green Energy
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course provides an introductory overview of the current and future roles of carbon-based fuels, nuclear fission, hydro-electric, solar, and wind as the energy sources that power modern civilizations. Topics include introductory concepts of power and energy, fuel combustion, electromagnetism, nuclear fission and fusion, thermodynamics, and simple quantum physics. Students will apply scientific theories and principles by analysis of current issues and problems. Students will explore energy conversion by building working models and gathering data using inquiry-based approaches. Information will be used to analyze problems and draw conclusions in the realm of green energy.

SC 109 - Introduction to Forensic Science
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is an introductory course for students to learn how basic principles of biology, chemistry, and physics are applied in criminal investigations. Fundamentals of identification, collection and preservation of physical evidence are discussed. In the laboratory, scientific techniques are applied to analyze and compare physical analysis of materials, chromatography, forensic anthropology, DNA fingerprinting, fingerprint anaylsis, drug identification and toxicology.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisites:  MA 025 Accelerated Algebra, MA 025A Algebra A, MA 025B Algebra B or test placement


SC 111 - Introduction to Sustainability
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is designed to provide the fundamentals of sustainability principles and practices relative to population issues, climate change, renewable energy, consumption, ecosystem threats, transportation, green design and construction, biodiversity, human labor management, and environmental justice.

SC 112 - Sport Nutrition
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course will explore the latest sports nutrition research on hydration and fluid intake, supplements, energy drinks and the role of carbohydrate and protein loading during exercise. Macronutrients, Bioenergetics and measurement of energy will be covered as regards to diets that provide optimal nutrition for both athletes and fitness participants.

SC 201 - Basic Pharmacology
( 1 :0 :0 ) 1 credits

This course covers the basic categories of drugs and their effects on human physiological systems. Pharmacological actions, effects, and typical uses, and the associated terminology are also emphasized.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 100 - Human Biology
OR
BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I

SC 202 - Introduction to Geology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course is a study of the origin and evolution of the Earth, the rocks and minerals which compose it, the processes which are constantly changing it, the risks associated with geologic hazards, and the role of geology in shaping the human environment. The course presents the tools, methods, and approach employed by practicing geologists. Laboratory exercises and field trips introduce rocks, minerals, fossils, maps, and landscape features. The laboratory component will include the scientific method, collection and analysis of data, field study methods, computer simulations, and field trips designed to explore the geology of New Jersey.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisites: MA 103 Basic Statistics and MA 109 Pre-Calculus or MA 120 Calculus I


SC 206 - Environmental Ethics
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course will explore introductory concepts in environmental science and ecology through the lens of environmental ethics. Questions surrounding the impact of differing world views upon environmental behavior, the bases for environmental decision making, societal responsibilites to future generations, and the moral accounting of human and nonhuman species will be evaluated from varied perspectives of utilitarianism, holism, social ecology, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Applications to local environmental issues will be considered.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I
OR
BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I
OR
CH 111 - General Chemistry I
OR
SC 104 - Introduction to Environmental Science
OR
SC 111 - Introduction to Sustainability

SC 290 - Select Topics in Science
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is designed to develop a student’s ability to apply scientific knowledge and laboratory skills to solving literature and/or research problems. Course projects are tailored to the individual student based on his/her academic history.

Pre-Requisites:
BS 101 - Biology I
OR
BS 102 - Biology II
OR
BS 201 - Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology
OR
CH 112 - General Chemistry II
OR
PY 101 - College Physics I
OR
PY 120 - Physics I

Choose any one of the following courses: BS 101, BS 102, CH 112, PY 101, PY 120, or BS 201. 


SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a study of the basic concepts in social interaction, analyzing aspects of the immediate culture, defining and evaluating the individual behavior in inter-group relations, social organization and processes, and elements of social control and deviance in a changing society.

SO 102 - Institutional Racism I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course follows an historical approach to the evolution of racism, the identification of racism, and a study of power and control in America’s major institutions.

Pre-Requisites:
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SO 105 - Social Problems
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores major global social problems from three theoretical perspectives (structural functionalist, conflict, and symbolic interactionist theory) with an emphasis on problems occurring in the United States such as health care, substance abuse, crime, poverty, unemployment, and racial, ethnic, and gender inequalities. Solutions to these problems are also discussed and analyzed.

Note: This course was formerly SO 201.

SO 107 - Sociology of Aging
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course deals with the cultural and sociological factors of aging. Emphasis is placed on adult socialization groups, social institutions and the elderly, social problems of the elderly, and programs and prospects for the elderly.

Pre-Requisites:
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SO 202 - Cultural Anthropology
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the basic concepts of anthropology through a comparative approach to human society and culture focusing on various cultural institutions such as religion, economics, family, kinship, art, and politics.

SO 203 - Sociology of the Family
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the universal social institution of marriage and family from a sociological perspective by examining the crises and challenges facing families today and the process of family development, which includes mate selection, dating, engagement, marriage, parenthood, divorce, and blended families.

SO 204 - Cultural Comparisons
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the customs, values, attitudes, world views, and behavior of ethnic groups in Passaic County. Students gain an increased understanding, appreciation, and tolerance of the behavior of people from various cultural and social groups. This course is especially useful for those who work with people from various ethnic groups.