2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


PS 206 - Behavior Modification
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores behavior modification principles and application with an emphasis on reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, token economy, desensitization, extinction, and shaping and how to apply these techniques in a realistic setting. 

Pre-Requisites:
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology

PS 207 - Educational Psychology
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the psychological concepts related to the teaching and learning process with an emphasis on contemporary educational research and actual classroom practices. It is recommended for students interested in teaching or working in schools.

Pre-Requisites:
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology

PS 208 - Human Sexuality
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the biological, psychological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality. Topics include attraction, love, sexual anatomy, sexual response cycle, sexual differentiation and orientation, sexual reproduction, contraception, sexual behaviors, sexual dysfunctions, and sexually transmitted illnesses.

Crosslisted as SO 208; no credit is given if the students have taken SO 208.

Pre-Requisites:
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology
OR
SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

PS 209 - Adult Development and Aging
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the biological, cognitive, psychological, and social development from early adulthood to late adulthood. Topics include mental health issues, personality, and life transitions such as parenthood, employment, retirement, widowhood, and death.

Pre-Requisites:
PS 101 - Introduction to Psychology

PSRT 1019 - Clinical Practicum in Psychiatric Rehabilitation I B
( 3 :16 :0 ) 6 credits

This course builds on the knowledge that students obtained in previous courses, including basic information about severe mental illness, program models, communication techniques, and group skills. The course enables students to identify and begin to practice common interventions used in psychiatric rehabilitation settings. Classroom lectures and discussions provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory with the practical experience gained at their field placements. The 240-hour clinical practicum experience emphasizes participation, under supervision, in skills training and other group and individual rehabilitative activities.This is a clinical course.

PSRT 1101 - Introduction to the Principles of Psychosocial Rehabilitation
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course enables students to identify the methods by which individuals with severe mental illness are helped in psychiatric rehabilitation and treatment settings. Classroom lectures and discussions provide students with opportunities to explore concepts unique to psychiatric rehabilitation, including its history, philosophy, and values. Students begin to conceptualize psychiatric rehabilitation as a set of innovative modalities designed to restore the individual to his/her maximal level of functioning.

PSRT 1102 - Communication Techniques
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides students with a foundation of knowledge in all aspects of communication and provides opportunities to practice communication techniques for use in professional situations.  .  Students are introduced to concepts regarding the development of language and communication as they explore various types of communication and language disorders and their impact on daily life and participation.  Students learn how culture impacts communication and complete a project that examines concepts of health literacy. Students collaborate to conduct an interview with an adult and a child to develop and document and occupational profile.

PSRT 1103 - Group Intervention for People with Disabilities
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

Groups are an integral part of psychiatric rehabilitation and occupational therapy service delivery.  This course provides students with an understanding of the basic elements of group dynamics and prepares students with the skills needed to become an effective group facilitator.  Classroom lectures provide students with information about types of groups and an overview of group dynamics including the stages of group development, group member roles, group norms, and group leadership. Laboratory experiences equip students with skills needed to plan and implement group interventions that address the needs of clients with various disabilities and use a collaborative team approach.Students learn to provide feedback to group members and evaluate the group process.There is an emphasis on teaching students to facilitate skills training groups for people with psychiatric disabilities.

 

PSRT 1204 - Clinical Principles in Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Treatment
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces students to current clinical, diagnostic, and treatment paradigms and examines their relationship to current psychiatric rehabilitation practice. Students are introduced to the language of DSM-V and its translation into behaviors, the role of research in the etiology and treatment of mental illness, the relationship between clinical practitioners, and psychiatric psychotropic drugs and their side effects

PSRT 2019 - Clinical Practicum in Psychiatric Rehabilitation II
( 3 :16 :0 ) 6 credits

This course builds upon the knowledge obtained in prerequisite courses, and enables students to continue to develop and apply rehabilitative and clinical skills in a 240 supervised clinical practicum experience. In addition, students begin to participate in the assessment and service planning process and learn how to document consumers’ progress toward their rehabilitation goals. Lectures and discussions assist students in evaluating their field experiences, as well as foster consolidation of classroom learning with applied clinical and rehabilitation practice standards and professional ethics.

This is a clinical course.

PSRT 2121 - Community Resource Management
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course builds upon students’ prior knowledge of the principles and practices of psychiatric rehabilitation. The focus of the course is on the community support system and case management functions. Emphasis is on linkage to, and coordination of, various community resources utilized by people who have psychiatric disabilities. Students learn that in addition to psychiatric rehabilitation and mental health treatment, consumers need access to many other supports and services in the community, such as entitlements, protection, and advocacy services and peer support. This is a web-based (online) course.

PSRT 2231 - Emerging Topics in Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Treatment
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course acquaints students with emerging developments in the field of psychiatric rehabilitation, focusing on current issues and trends. Students are introduced to research methods and the concept of evidence-based practice. The purpose of the course is to help the student conceptualize psychiatric rehabilitation as a diverse and evolving field that adapts to an emerging knowledge base, as well as demographic, public policy, and cultural changes.This is a web-based (online) course.

PT 101 - Introduction to Photography
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course covers the basics of camera work and composition and familiarizes students with lighting techniques for indoor and outdoor shooting and photo editing techniques. Students must have access to a Digital SLR camera and provide their own photo printing. Field trips are included.

PY 101 - College Physics I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is the first in a two-semester sequence of algebra and trigonometry-based physics. It is recommended for majors in natural science, liberal arts, or technology, and it covers vectors, kinematics, dynamics, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, rotational motions, solid and fluid mechanics, heat, thermodynamics, and sound.

Pre-Requisites:
MA 109 - Pre-Calculus Mathematics

PY 102 - College Physics II
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is the second in a two-semester sequence of algebra and trigonometry-based physics. It covers waves, electrostatics, electric fields, direct current electricity, magnetic fields, induction, alternating current electricity, light, relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear physics.

Pre-Requisites:
PY 101 - College Physics I

PY 120 - Physics I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is the first in a three-semester, calculus-based physics sequence. It is recommended for majors in engineering, pure science, or mathematics, and it covers vectors, kinematics, dynamics, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, circular and rotational motion, gravitational forces, solid and fluid mechanics, and heat and thermodynamics.

Pre-Requisites:
MA 120 - Calculus I

This is the first in a three-semester, calculus-based physics sequence. It is recommended for majors in engineering, pure science, or mathematics, and it covers vectors, kinematics, dynamics, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, circular and rotational motion, gravitational forces, solid and fluid mechanics, and heat and thermodynamics.


PY 121 - Physics II
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is the second in a three-semester, calculus-based physics sequence. It covers waves, sound, electrostatics, electric fields, Gauss’s law, electrical potential, capacitors, circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere’s law, Lenz’s law, induction, and alternating currents.

Pre-Requisites:
PY 120 - Physics I

PY 220 - Physics III
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is the third in a three-semester, calculus-based physics sequence. It covers electromagnetic waves, geometric optics, interference, diffraction, relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear structure, and elementary particles. 

Pre-Requisites:
PY 121 - Physics II

RA 101 - Introduction to Radiologic Science
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is an introduction to radiography through orientation, the history of radiology, professional ethics and medical law, elementary radiation protection, nursing procedures, image processing, and medical terminology. This course includes 3 hours of lab each week where skills related to radiation safety and protection, body mechanics, patient care and procedures are demonstrated, practiced, and tested.

Co-Requisites:
RA 102 - Principles of Radiologic Science I
RA 103 - Radiologic Practicum and Critique Seminar

RA 102 - Principles of Radiologic Science I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is the study of radiographic examinations of the thorax, abdomen, upper extremity, lower extremity, shoulder girdle and pelvic girdle. The course includes 3 hours of lab each week where skills related to performing these examinations/ procedures are demonstrated, practiced and tested.

 

Co-Requisites:
RA 101 - Introduction to Radiologic Science
RA 103 - Radiologic Practicum and Critique Seminar