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2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


ARB 101 - Elementary Arabic I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course focuses on the basics of the Arabic language. The four basic skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking are introduced. Students will practice pronunciation of the alphabet and vocabulary. Group work and discussion on Arabic culture and tradition are an integral component of this course. This course assumes no previous knowledge of the Arabic language.

ARB 102 - Elementary Arabic II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a continuation of Elementary Arabic I. The four language skills—listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing—continue to be developed.

Pre-Requisites:
ARB 101 - Elementary Arabic I

OR permission of instructor.


ASL 103 - Fingerspelling
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course develops finger spelling skills such as hand configuration, basic word patterns, rhythm, comprehension of finger spelled words, phrases, palm orientation, and numbers. 

Offered in Fall semester or Summer only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 108 - American Sign Langauge II

ASL 104 - American Sign Language I
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides a functional notational approach to learning American Sign Language (ASL), a visual-gestural language used by the Deaf Community. Students will be exposed to functional conversational skills of ASL. Students will participate in communicative activities within the classroom setting in order to develop expressive and receptive skills. Various skills-based activities will allow students to develop competency in ASL in order to express and understand signed conversations. This course is total immersion; talking will not be permitted in class. This course requires a minimum of 5 contact hours with the Deaf Community.

Offered in Fall and Spring semesters only.

 Note: This course requires students to be at college level reading and writing. 

ASL 105 - Deaf Culture and History
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines the history and culture of the Deaf. Discussions will include the values, norms, identities, traditions, and subcultures within the larger culture. Questions such as the nature of sign language, the education of deaf individuals, and historical treatment of deafness will be explored.Offered Fall and Spring semester only.

 Note: This course requires students to be at college level reading and writing.

ASL 108 - American Sign Langauge II
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course develops conversational skills on an intermediate level. Grammar and vocabulary are presented around communicative purposes of everyday interaction. Students will engage in sign discourse on a broad range of topics and develop more advanced receptive and expressive skills. This course is total immersion; talking will not be permitted in class. This course requires 10 mandatory contact hours with the Deaf Community.Offered Spring semester only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 104 - American Sign Language I

ASL 109 - American Sign Language Syntax and Grammar
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces the syntax and grammar of American Sign Language through written dialogues. Students will develop skill application through signing syntactically and grammatically correct ASL dialogues. Components of American Sign Language such as transcription symbols, sentence types, classifiers, non-manual behaviors, pronominalization, locatives, pluralization, subjects and objects, verbs, and temporal and distributional aspects will be discussed.Offered in Spring semester only.

Co-Requisites:
ASL 108 - American Sign Langauge II

ASL 201 - American Sign Language III
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines complex everyday language functions of American Sign Language. Skill development application is acquired through interactive activities in order to achieve a broader scope of understanding complex discourse within American Sign Language. Competency in grammar, syntax, and non-manual behaviors are further developed through storytelling activities. Students language function skills in ASL are demonstrated, practiced, and tested in the College laboratory.  Offered in Summer only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 108 - American Sign Langauge II
ASL 109 - American Sign Language Syntax and Grammar

ASL 202 - American Sign Language IV
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines folklore and the art of storytelling in American Sign Language. Students will engage in literary analysis of stories presented in American Sign Language. Students will study cultural and linguistic aspects used in storytelling, folklore, and poetry in addition to presenting stories in American Sign Language. Students storytelling and language skills in ASL are demonstrated, practiced, and tested in the College laboratory. 

Offered Fall only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 105 - Deaf Culture and History
ASL 201 - American Sign Language III

ASL 203 - Introduction to Interpreting I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines the history of interpreting, interpreter ethics, interpreting in a variety of specialized settings, interpreter process, attitudes and the role of the interpreter. Ideological components, principles, and practices of interpreting for the Deaf Community will be examined. Students will learn about national certification and the licensing process. Students are required to accrue 10 mandatory field observation hours observing sign language interpreters with five or more years of experience.Offered Fall only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 105 - Deaf Culture and History
ASL 109 - American Sign Language Syntax and Grammar

ASL 205 - Interpreting II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides an understanding of the role of culture and language in relation to interpreting, cultural identity and affiliation, power, oppression and the interpreter. Causes and cures of Overuse Syndrome will be explored. Students will engage in dialogue regarding ethical decision making relating to interpreting situations. Students are required to accrue 10 mandatory field observation hours observing sign language interpreters with five years or more experience.Offered Spring only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 203 - Introduction to Interpreting I

Co-Requisites:
ASL 202 - American Sign Language IV

ASL 210 - ASL-English Translation Skills Studies
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines translation techniques in order for students to engage in message analysis, discourse mapping, and processing a message. Students will learn strategies in order to comprehend the register of the speaker, the speaker’s goals, components of prosody, and appropriate linguistic forms used within ASL and English written and video texts.Offered Fall only.

Co-Requisites:
ASL 202 - American Sign Language IV

ASL 215 - ASL-English Interpreting
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines the theory and practice of processing signed messages into spoken English. Emphasis will be on application of appropriate vocabulary selection, use of syntactically correct English sentences, and appropriate voicing register. Various interpreting process models will be introduced and discussed. Consecutive and simultaneous interpreting will be examined. Students’ interpretation skills from ASL into English is demonstrated, practiced, and tested in the College laboratory.

 Offered Spring only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 210 - ASL-English Translation Skills Studies

ASL 218 - English-ASL Interpreting
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines strategies for effective listening skills, text analysis, discourse mapping, conceptual accuracy and linguistic factors for sign language. These components of English to ASL skills will be discussed and applied through skill-development activities. Students' interpretation skills from English to ASL is demonstrated, practiced, and tested in the College laboratory.

 Offered Spring only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 210 - ASL-English Translation Skills Studies

ASL 221 - Interpreting Practicum
( 1 :0 :9 ) 4 credits

This course provides students with an opportunity to practice interpreting skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. Under the supervision of experienced interpreters, students will interpret for deaf consumers, who have diverse linguistic preferences, in a variety of settings. By working with professionals and Deaf clients, the student will learn to interpret effectively. This course requires development of a paper and video portfolio, 135 hours of practicum, and a weekly 50-minute seminar (supervision). Offered Fall or Summer only.

Pre-Requisites:
ASL 215 - ASL-English Interpreting
ASL 218 - English-ASL Interpreting

BS 100 - Human Biology
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This is a one-semester lecture and laboratory course designed for non-science majors for the study of the structure and function of all the body systems. It covers such current issues as genetic engineering and biotechnology and health concerns such as AIDS and cancer. Laboratory experiments include light microscopy, human anatomy and physiology, and representative dissections.

Pre-Requisites:

MA 025 Accelerated Algebra, MA 025A Algebra A, MA 025B Algebra B or test placement


BS 101 - Biology I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the basic study of the principles underlying the science of cells and organisms. Included are topics related to biochemistry, cell structure and function, effects of the physical environment on cells, genetics, genetic engineering, heredity, evolution, and selected biological problems. Laboratory experiments include investigations of physical and chemical life processes, analysis of cellular components, cellular functions, cell reproduction, and heredity.

BS 102 - Biology II
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course explores the basic study of representative organisms of the five kingdoms, with an emphasis on classification, differential features, and reproduction. For the plant and animal kingdoms, it covers fundamentals of development, physiological control systems, organ systems, nutrition, movement, ecology, and selected biological problems of representative organisms. The laboratory sessions include dissections and experimental studies of selected representative organisms for all kingdoms. 

BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic structural and functional relationships of the human body at the cellular, organ, and system levels, including the major histological and gross anatomical structures of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Anatomy is emphasized in the laboratory. Knowledge of chemistry required.

BS 104 - Anatomy and Physiology II
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

This course studies the major anatomical and functional aspects of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems, as well as nutrition, metabolism, and acid-base balance, and homeostatic mechanisms. Laboratory exercises include anatomical dissections, microscopic study, and physiology activities

Pre-Requisites:
BS 103 - Anatomy and Physiology I