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2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


HIT 212 - Computer Applications in Healthcare Organizations
( 2 :3 :0 ) 3 credits

In this course, students will study the application of computer technology and information processing techniques used in health professions and in health care facilities. In laboratory activities, students apply theory to application in an electronic health record system. Offered in Fall only.

Pre-Requisites:
CIS 101 - Computer Concepts and Applications

or CIS 107 Information Technology Fundamentals and Applications. 


HIT 216 - Coding Professional Practice Experience
( 0 :0 :8 ) 2 credits

This course provides supervised practice in ICD and CPT coding systems, billing, and reimbursement. 120 hours directed practice Offered in Spring and Summer only.

Co-Requisites:
HIT 221 - Advanced ICD and Coding Applications
HIT 231 - CPT Coding
HIT 240 - Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement

HIT 221 - Advanced ICD and Coding Applications
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course focuses on continued studies of ICD coding guidelines. Development of advanced coding techniques using inpatient and outpatient health records with an emphasis on computerized encoding and coding for regulatory compliance and prospective payment system is further explored. Coding skills are practiced and assessed in laboratory activities using tutorials, case studies and actual records. Offered in Spring only.

Pre-Requisites:
HIT 201 - ICD Coding

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
HIT 231 - CPT Coding

HIT 231 - CPT Coding
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces coding in ambulatory settings with emphasis on coding healthcare procedures and services using CPT/HCPCS. Diagnostic coding for outpatient services, the relationship between coding and reimbursement, and ethical issues are also introduced. Coding skills are practiced and assessed in laboratory activities using tutorials, case studies and actual records. Offered in Spring only.

Pre-Requisites:
HIT 104 - Health Care Terminology
HIT 108 - Health Record Content and Structure

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
BS 205 - Physiology of Disease

HIT 240 - Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces reimbursement methodologies in acute and non-acute care settings. Topics include prospective payment methodologies, hospital revenue cycle, case mix analysis, charge master maintenance, regulatory guidelines, reimbursement monitoring, and compliance strategies. 

 

Pre-Requisites:
HIT 201 - ICD Coding

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
HIT 231 - CPT Coding

HIT 270 - Hospital Inpatient Coding Applications
( 1 :8 :0 ) 5 credits

This course focuses on the assignment and sequencing of diagnosis and procedure codes for inpatient (acute care) services. Emphasis will be placed on the application of ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Official Coding Guideline, Coding Clinic guidance, as well as documentation requirements, reimbursement issues, coding ethics and compliance. Advanced coding skills are practiced and assessed in laboratory activities using health records.

 

Pre-Requisites:
HIT 221 - Advanced ICD and Coding Applications
HIT 240 - Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement

HIT 272 - Hospital Outpatient Coding Applications
( 1 :6 :0 ) 4 credits

This course focuses on the assignment of diagnosis and procedure codes for hospital outpatient services, including Ambulatory Surgery and Emergency Department. Emphasis will be placed on the application of ICD-10-CM Official Coding Guidelines, Coding Clinic guidance, CPT Assistant guidance, as well as documentation requirements, reimbursement issues, coding ethics and compliance. Advanced coding skills are practiced and assessed in laboratory activities using health records.

 

Pre-Requisites:
HIT 221 - Advanced ICD and Coding Applications
HIT 231 - CPT Coding
HIT 240 - Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement

HIT 274 - Health Information Management Topics for Coders
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course focuses on coding related competencies including health information documentation, regulatory and reporting requirements, data quality and management, information and communication technologies, privacy, confidentiality, legal and ethical issues and compliance.

Pre-Requisites:
HIT 221 - Advanced ICD and Coding Applications
HIT 231 - CPT Coding
HIT 240 - Principles of Healthcare Reimbursement

HLS 104 - Introduction to Homeland Security
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the public and private sector dimensions of the theory and practice of Home Security at the national, regional, state, and local level. An overview of the administrative, legislative, and operational elements of homeland security programs and processes (including a review of homeland security history, policies, and programs) is provided. Topics include the threat of terrorism and countermeasures, including intelligence, investigation, and policy that support U.S. homeland security objectives.

HLS 105 - Criminal Investigation
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course studies the techniques and procedures of criminal investigation, the methods of crime prevention, and the use and acceptance of informants and electronic surveillance. Topics include information retrieval, recognition, development, and preservation of material evidence, and interview and interrogation techniques.

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
CJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
OR
HLS 104 - Introduction to Homeland Security

HLS 202 - Hazardous Materials
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course comprehensively studies the physical, chemical, and toxicological characteristics of hazardous materials. It includes the basic methods of recognition and identification based upon the chemical and physical properties of hazardous materials; basic safety procedures when utilizing specific types of protective clothing and equipment; and basic tactical information relating to scene management.

Pre-Requisites:
CJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
OR
FS 101 - Principles of Emergency Services
OR
HLS 104 - Introduction to Homeland Security

HLS 210 - Current Issues in Homeland Security/Capstone Experience
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides the opportunity for students to explore significant and controversial topics regarding terrorism and homeland security and to engage in in-depth analyses of current events and important trends in terrorism and Homeland Security. It presents an opportunity for students to focus on special issues such as terrorism and the internet, homeland security, interrogating the CIA, and prosecuting the terrorist. Students will be required to complete a research project on a topic of interest.

Pre-Requisites:

A minimum of forty (40) credits must be successfully completed from the Homeland Security Program.


HLS 214 - Emergency Management and Response
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course examines the theories, principles, and practices of emergency management. The philosophy of comprehensive emergency management is discussed with the four attendant steps: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. In addition, legal issues involving state and federal laws affecting emergency operations are studied.

Pre-Requisites:

CJ 101 and FS 101 or CJ 105


HN 101 - Introduction to Community Healthcare Navigation
( 4 :0 :0 ) 4 credits

This course introduces students to the role and responsibilities of the community healthcare navigator. It addresses workplace protocols, strategies for dealing with community agencies and clients, the health care delivery system, and legal and ethical issues related to the field. Healthy living, along with chronic diseases and their consequences are presented.  

HN 115 - Communication Skills and Cultural Competence
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course provides the content and skills in communication to assist the community healthcare navigator in effectively interacting with a variety of clients, their families, and a range of healthcare providers. Included are verbal/nonverbal communication, listening, networking, building trust and working in teams. These skills are grounded within the context of the community's culture and the cultural implications that can affect client healthcare. 

HN 120 - Community Healthcare Navigation Internship I
( 1 :0 :3 ) 2 credits

This course provides students with the opportunity to work with agencies and learn the process of integrating classroom knowledge, skills, and techniques with real life navigation practices. Forty five (45) hours in the field are required. In addition, students meet one hour a week with the instructor to reflect on and share their experiences.  

HN 201 - Advanced Community Healthcare Navigation
( 4 :0 :0 ) 4 credits

This course builds on the introductory course through further exploration and clarification of the roles and ethical responsibilities of the navigator. It focuses on the navigator's role as advocate in assisting clients with navigating the healthcare system and insurance reimbursement. it emphasizes the importance of wellness and how the navigator can assist clients in living a healthy life. 

HN 218 - Documentation and Reporting for the Community Healthcare Navigator
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course focuses on the importance and ability of the Navigator to gather, document, and report on client visits and other activities. Emphasis is on appropriate, accurate, and clear documentation with consideration of legal and agency requirements.

HN 220 - Community Healthcare Navigation Externship II
( 1 :0 :3 ) 2 credits

This course continues the objectives of CWN Externship I with the addition of writing a resume and practicing job interviewing techniques. 

HP 200 - Honors Program Capstone
( 2 :0 :0 ) 2 credits

This course is designed to provide students with academic, personal, and career development focusing on leadership acquired in the Honors Program. Students will be provided opportunities to integrate and apply what they have learned in their in and out-of-class academic experiences, with emphasis on demonstrating breadth and depth in critical analysis, synthesis, integration, communication, and creativity. This course is an intensive product of both group and individual research and is designed for interdisciplinary learning.

Note: For every 140 minutes of weekly instructional time, students are expected to complete 280 minutes of assigned work outside of class. This will be facilitated through homework assignments.

Pre-Requisites:

Students must complete nine (9) Honors course credits.