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2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


FS 205 - Fire Investigation
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This in-depth course defines successful methods for conducting fire investigations. Specific topics include basic chemistry of fire, point of origin, fire cause (both accidental and incendiary), motivation of the fire setter, fire scene investigations, evidence collection, photography, follow-up investigation, and court testimony.

Pre-Requisites:
FS 101 - Principles of Emergency Services

FS 206 - Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. 

Pre-Requisites:
FS 101 - Principles of Emergency Services
MA 101 - College Mathematics I

FS 210 - Current Issues in Fire Science/Capstone Experience
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a comprehensive review of the current problems affecting the fire service with particular emphasis placed on resource allocation, planning, and fiscal constraints. The Capstone Experience requires the student to author and present a scholarly research paper on a topic covered in this course.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisite: A minimum of 40 credit hours must be successfully completed from the Fire Science Technology Program prior to enrolling in this course.


FS 213 - Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety Survival
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This courses introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavioral change throughout the emergency services.

GD 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as AR 110.  

This course trains students to apply the principles and elements of design to create original work in advertising, editorial, and promotional print materials and presentations. Students will explore typography and how it relates to the layout and design of information, as well as portfolio presentation and preparing work for print. Students will use graphic design programs in the Adobe suite, including Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator.

Pre-Requisites:
DE 010 - Academic English I
OR
ENR 107 - Advanced ELS Reading and Speaking II ENR 107L Lab

GD 127 - Microcomputer Software III
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as CIS 127.

Provides students with advanced experience with three popular productivity tools used in the business world, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, and Microsoft Outlook.  Students will learn advanced word processing features available in Microsoft Word, including macros, collaboration, and document automation, and will learn advanced features in Microsoft PowerPoint, including collaboration, interactivity, and customization. Students will learn how to configure and utilize Microsoft Outlook in a business environment. Through demonstration and projects, students will develop the skills needed to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) examinations in PowerPoint and Word. Offered nights only in Spring.

Pre-Requisites:
CIS 125 - Microcomputer Software I

GD 170 - Website Design & Tools
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as CIS 170.

This course provides a hands-on experience for students interested in learning how to develop websites. Students gain an understanding of terminology, web design, and web operation functions, and they explore a variety of methods available for building a website. Both HTML5 and CSS3 will be introduced. Students use a high-level, web-authoring tool to build web pages for a website that can utilize a database and is published onto a network server.

 

Pre-Requisites:
CIS 101 - Computer Concepts and Applications
OR
CIS 107 - Information Technology Fundamentals and Applications

GD 205 - Typography
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides an essential foundation for graphic design students to understand how to use type effectively to communicate information and ideas. Students are introduced to the history of written communication: from the earliest cave pictographs and the invention of movable type, to today’s digital creation of typefaces, logos, icons, and symbols that are part of the continued human desire to express ideas and describe the world. Typographic terms, classifications, and styles, as well as measurement systems, are discussed in order to explore the differences between legibility and readability. Creating a visual hierarchy with text formatting and basic layout is covered in lectures as well as lab assignments.

 

Pre-Requisites:
GD 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design

GD 210 - Computer Enhanced Layout and Design
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as AR 210.

This course trains the student to apply the principles and elements of design to create original work in digital media, advertising and promotional print materials. Students will explore how information flows through multi-page layouts to build original pages. The student will further explore software used by graphic designers including programs in the Adobe Suite, InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator.

 

Pre-Requisites:
AR 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design

GD 211 - Advanced Graphic Design
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as AR 211.

This course trains the student to apply the principles and elements of design along with typographic skills to create a variety of print and media projects using programs in the Adobe Suite including InDesign. Advanced techniques in Illustrator and Photoshop will be used to prepare the student’s original artwork for importing into their final portfolio.

Pre-Requisites:
AR 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design

GD 230 - Portfolio Presentation
( 1 :2 :0 ) 2 credits

This course is essential in the preparation of a portfolio for Graphic Design students.  As a building block of transitioning from student to working designer, a strong portfolio can also provide an important foundation for the development of a successful career.  The course assignments will give students guidance for improving their current portfolio pieces as well as developing new portfolio pieces, and presenting their work, and themselves, to prospective employers in a compelling way.  Students transferring to four-year schools need a strong portfolio for acceptance.

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
GD 205 - Typography
GD 210 - Computer Enhanced Layout and Design

GD 273 - Web Graphics
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as CIS 273.

This course introduces students to creating and applying effective graphics, text, video, animation, and sound to a website. Students use authorizing tools to create and edit multimedia components, and apply these to enhance and publish a website. Students will focus on responsive web design for desktop, tablet, and mobile devices. Software used is Adobe Dreamweaver and Animate (formerly Flash). Offered nights only in Fall.

Pre-Requisites:
CIS 170 - Website Design and Tools

GD 294 - Internship Program
( 0 :0 :6 ) 2 credits

Cross listed as CIS 294. 

This course gives students the opportunity to work as an intern in an approved position in their chosen major and specialization. Students will work at a job site for 90 hours over the course of the semester, spread out over 8-10 weeks. Acceptance is not guaranteed; students must show a strong academic history (both in the major and outside), strong interpersonal skills, and have a history of reliability and integrity in the classroom. Students will be required to attend a pre-semester workshop, so early registration is critical to placement. Coursework will include a resume, weekly reports, a LinkedIn profile, and a post-internship presentation. Supervision is provided by the College through on-the-job visits and individual progress review sessions.

 

Pre-Requisites:

30 College credits (with 12 credits
in CIS/GD courses)


GD 295 - Graphic Design Capstone
( 0 :0 :6 ) 2 credits

Students in their final semester, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, are required to use the full scope of their academic training to design and develop a portfolio. In addition to representing their artwork in print and web design, the portfolio must include a resume and self-promotion piece containing contact information as well as work samples. Students will make final presentations to the faculty who will critique the project’s content, approach, and degree of professionalism.

Pre-Requisites:

: GD 170 and 3 classes from GD 110, GD 205, GD 210, GD 211


GE 101 - Cultural Geography
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Emphasis is placed on the general concepts of human geography, including theories, maps, and vocabulary of the discipline. Topics include technology, race, language, religion, the nation, cultural realms, economics, urbanism, migration, population, and ecology.

GE 103 - Urban Geography
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course studies the historical development of urbanism as well as the present distribution and structure of major urban areas of the world. Emphasis is placed on the present state of the New York metropolitan area.

GIS 101 - Fundamentals of GIS
( 3 :3 :0 ) 4 credits

Cross listed as SC 108

This course covers basic topics in storing, retrieving, mapping and analyzing different types of data (scientific, political, cultural economic, etc.) with ESRI & ArcGIS software.  Students will learn the basic use of GIS and be exposed to how applications are used in various disciplines and employment settings.  Labs include class use of the software and Web CT facilitated projects.

HI 101 - History of Western Civilization I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course surveys Europe to 1600 with a major emphasis on concepts and movements vital to understanding the modern world. It stresses economic and cultural forces. Major topics include ancient civilizations, Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment and the beginnings of the Scientific and Industrial revolutions, Reformation, and voyages of discovery.

HI 102 - History of Western Civilization II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course surveys the evolution of western civilization from 1600 to the present and how we fit into this complex process. Major topics include the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, the impact of Liberalism, Nationalism, and Socialism, the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and colonial conflicts of the 19th century, Russian and Chinese Revolutions, World Wars I and II, the Cold War and its aftermath, and the relationship of the United States to the rest of the world.

HI 103 - History of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course focuses on the study of the basic characteristics of Puerto Rican and Caribbean cultures and their role within contemporary U.S. civilization. The consequences of European conquest, Indian explorations, the slave trade, the Spanish-American War, patterns of land ownership, demography, politics, unemployment, and industrialization are examined in relation to a multi-ethnic world. A research paper is required.