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2018-2019

Course Descriptions

Courses are listed in alphabetical order. A two- or three-letter each number. Courses are frequently referred to simply by the abbreviation and number, such as ASL 104 (American Sign Language I). The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of lecture, lab, studio, or fieldwork hours per week, assuming a typical 15-week semester. Only courses numbered 100 or above are applicable toward a degree.

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites. Prerequisites consist of a course, courses, or competencies that a student must have completed before being allowed to register for a more advanced course in the same or related subject area. Corequisites are courses that a student is required to take while enrolled or prior to enrollment in another related course. If a course description does not list a specific requirement, the successful demonstration of proficiency in basic academic skills is understood. During the preregistration session, skills are evaluated to determine adequacy for college-level studies. This includes evaluating previous educational records and the results of placement tests administered by the College. Not all courses are offered each semester. A schedule of course offerings is published for each semester.

General Education Courses. Courses that fulfill the General Education Requirements are indicated with a red triangle. For example: ▲ ASL 104 American Sign Language I

Credit Hour Requirement. The college offers two traditional 15-week semesters (Fall and Spring). A Master grid has been developed for these terms to ensure that courses meet for the appropriate amount of time (typically a 3 credit course will meet twice a week for 75 minutes or once a week for 150 minutes). Class times are proportionally adjusted to be consistent with institutional policy for terms of shorter duration including Summer sessions. “Semester credit hour” means a minimum of 750 minutes of formalized instruction that typically requires students to work at out-of-class assignments at least twice the amount of time as the amount of formalized instruction (1,500 minutes). It is acknowledged that formalized instruction may take place in a variety of modes. Due to the fact that the pace of reading, writing, and other activities varies widely, time spent in any of these areas will not be identical for all students, instructors and courses. Rather assigned activities should reflect a reasonable expectation by the instructor of the time it would take to meet the learning objectives of the course or assignment.”


AC 101 - Financial Accounting I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of financial accounting including the accounting cycle, recording and posting transactions, adjusting and closing entries, financial statements, asset valuation, and depreciation.

Pre-Requisites:
MA 010 - Basic Mathematics
OR
MA 010B - Basic Mathematics B

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
BU 101 - Introduction to Business

AC 102 - Financial Accounting II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a continuation of the basic principles of financial accounting. It covers partnership, corporate accounting for stocks and bonds, cash flow statements, the reporting of unusual events, and financial analysis.

Pre-Requisites:
AC 101 - Financial Accounting I

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
CIS 125 - Microcomputer Software I

AC 203 - Accounting Applications using Excel
( 1 :0 :0 ) 1 credits

This course emphasizes setting up and solving accounting problems using Microsoft Excel.  Through lectures, demonstrations and individual exercises, the course covers (but is not limited to) mathematical and statistical functions, analysis across multiple worksheets and various formatting activities.

Pre-Requisites:
AC 102 - Financial Accounting II
CIS 125 - Microcomputer Software I

 


AC 205 - Managerial Accounting
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the study of managerial uses of accounting information for solving business problems. Among the topics covered are cost systems, manufacturing and cash budgets, process and job costing, the time value of money, and standard costs.

Pre-Requisites:
AC 101 - Financial Accounting I

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
CIS 125 - Microcomputer Software I

AC 225 - Federal Taxation - Theory and Practice
( 4 :0 :0 ) 4 credits

This course focuses on the study of the principles and laws pertaining to the preparation of federal and state individual and business income tax returns. It also emphasizes the use of tax preparation software, and how to conduct research on the IRS website.Offered in the Fall semester only

Pre-Requisites:
MA 010B - Basic Mathematics B
CIS 101 - Computer Concepts and Applications
OR
CIS 107 - Information Technology Fundamentals and Applications

AC 226 - Accounting Software Applications
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course explores the recording of business transactions using QuickBooks, an up-to-date commercial software program designed for small businesses. Utilizing QuickBooks software, the instruction emphasizes service businesses, merchandising businesses, and various legal forms of a business such as a sole proprietorship and a partnership.

Pre-Requisites:
CIS 125 - Microcomputer Software I

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
AC 102 - Financial Accounting II

AC 251 - Accounting Internship
( 0 :0 :9 ) 3 credits

This course will provide students with an opportunity to intern in accounting firms and gain valuable work experience. The Business Department will secure the internships which can be paid or unpaid positions. Supervision will be provided by the Business Department through on-the-job visits, discussions with accounting firm managers, and individual progress reports.

Requirements for this course:  2.75 GPA in accounting courses and a recommendation by two full-time business faculty.  Students not meeting these requirements will take any other business courses.

Pre-Requisites:
AC 225 - Federal Taxation - Theory and Practice
AC 226 - Accounting Software Applications

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
AC 295 - Accounting Capstone

AC 295 - Accounting Capstone
( 1 :0 :0 ) 1 credits

This course requires students in their final semester to use the full scope of their academic training to demonstrate their knowledge and application skills in accounting and Excel. This will be accomplished by assigning the student various projects covering areas such as the complete accounting cycle, payroll, job costing, bank reconciliations, financial statement development and analysis, taxation, budgeting, creating and maintaining computerized accounting systems using QuickBooks Pro, writing appropriate business documents, and evaluating ethical issues.

Pre-Requisites:
AC 226 - Accounting Software Applications

Prerequisites/Co-Requisites:
AC 225 - Federal Taxation - Theory and Practice

AE 101 - Appreciation of Art
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course provides exposure to, and experience in, the essential aspects of the visual arts. It serves to develop an understanding of art through studying the visual elements of art and design, the media and process, and an overview of the chronological progression of art through history from a cultural perspective. It examines how art communicates, how to describe, analyze and interpret it, and how to see art as both a product and reflection of the historical and cultural context it is created in.

AE 103 - Art History I
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course surveys selected works of art from Ancient to Medieval periods. Study will focus on major artistic and cultural developments and their reflection in significant works of art within the political, social, economic, and philosophical context of each period. In addition to general historical understanding, this course will provide development in skills of critical analysis and interpreting of artworks. At least one museum trip is required.

AE 104 - Art History II
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

This course entails the study of selected works of art from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Modern periods. Students learn about the unique aspects of composition in each historical period and acquire skills for analyzing and interpreting works of visual art. At least one field trip is required.

AR 101 - Drawing I
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course is a foundation studio providing the beginner with basic techniques and practices in composition, sketching, contour drawing, texture, value, and one- and two-point perspective.

AR 102 - Drawing II
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

The principles learned in Drawing I are further developed. Light and shade, line qualities, and more complex subjects are studied. Emphasis is placed on rendering natural forms, still life, and the costumed figure.

Pre-Requisites:
AE 101 - Appreciation of Art

AR 108 - Two-Dimensional Design
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This foundation course introduces the basic principles of two-dimensional design: line, shape, space, texture, value, and color. Students work with different media and techniques to develop projects that will explore these elements. Students also study principles of visual organization and the steps of the critique process.

Pre-Requisites:
AR 101 - Drawing I

AR 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as GD 110.

This course trains students to apply the principles and elements of design to create original work in advertising, editorial, and promotional print materials and presentations. Students will explore typography and how it relates to the layout and design of information, as well as portfolio presentation and preparing work for print. Students will use graphic design programs in Adobe suite, including Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator.

Pre-Requisites:

Prerequisite: DE 010 or ENR 107


AR 112 - Color Theory
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course builds on and expands the principles of design as covered in 2D Design while focusing primarily on the element of color. Through a combination of theory and practical studio-based exercises, students are introduced to a number of color theories and the principles of organization associated with them. Emphasis is placed on major developments in color theory in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Pre-Requisites:
AE 101 - Appreciation of Art
AR 108 - Two-Dimensional Design

AR 113 - Portfolio Preparation
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

In this course, students will develop and present a portfolio showcasing their best work as they learn to present themselves as art professionals. Topics include image reproductions, artist statement, resume and cover letters, preparing a digital portfolio, and other aspects of representation.

Pre-Requisites:
AR 102 - Drawing II
AR 108 - Two-Dimensional Design
AR 112 - Color Theory

AR 209 - Figure Drawing
( 2 :2 :0 ) 3 credits

This course introduces the fundamentals of drawing the human figure, from gesture drawing to finished work. Emphasis is on shape, form, value, structure, anatomy, proportion, and individual expression.

Pre-Requisites:
AR 102 - Drawing II

AR 210 - Computer Enhanced Layout and Design
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as GD 210.

This course trains the student to apply the principles and elements of design to the design and creation of original work in digital media, advertising and promotional print materials. Students will explore how information flows through multi-page layouts to build original pages. The student will further explore software used by graphic designers including InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator.

Pre-Requisites:
AR 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design

See GD 210.


AR 211 - Advanced Graphic Design
( 3 :0 :0 ) 3 credits

Cross listed as GD 211.

This course trains the student to apply the principles and elements of design along with typographic skills to create a variety of print and media projects using InDesign. Advanced techniques in IIlustrator and Photoshop will be used to prepare the student’s original artwork for importing into their final portfolio.

Pre-Requisites:
AR 110 - Introduction to Graphic Design

See GD 211.